Hadoop World: Talking HBase with Facebook’s Jonathan Gray

November 16, 2011

At Hadoop World, Facebook’s Jonathan Gray gave two talks: HBase Roapmap, and Building Realtime Big Data Services at Facebook with Hadoop and HBase.  While I wasn’t able to attend the sessions, at the end of the conference I was able to catch up with the man himself.

Here’s what he had to say:

Some of the ground Jonathan covers

  • How Jonathan got involved with HBase and how Facebook uses it
  • (1:00) Where does HBase fit in the big data ecosystem
  • (1:54) HBase vs MySQL
  • (2:44) The HBase community and where the committers reside
  • (5:35) What is Jonathan looking forward to in HBase (the “HBase DBA”)

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…


Eucalyptus back at OpenStack Design Summit

April 26, 2011

At the last OpenStack design summit, I sat down with Eucalyptus co-founder Graziano Obertelli and got his thoughts on the effort.  This morning I bumped into a now clean-shaven Graziano and thought Id get his input on this week’s summit.

Some of the ground Graziano covers:

  • What Graziano’s goals are for this weeks OpenStack summit
  • What sessions he plans to attend
  • Eucalyptus’s big upcoming 3.0 release
  • Looking forward to really engaging with the Eucalyptus community

Extra-credit reading:

Pau for now…


How to Community

July 7, 2009

Obligatory cheesy cavemen community illustration.

Obligatory cheesy cavemen community illustration.

The concept of community is one that has been around for quite a while (see image at left).

Originally at least partially defined as a group that shared a common physical location, this term over the last decade, with the help of the Internet, has vastly expanded to include virtual communities.  (Obviously other media before the Net like radio, TV, snail mail and smoke signals have helped to knit together physically separated individuals, however the Net has simply done it on a much larger and more immediate scale).

Powering Software and Presidents

As for its power, it was the Community that became the central driver behind a “new” model of Software creation, Free and Open Source Software.  No longer was code solely written by a group of engineers holed up in a room and fed pizza by sliding it under the door.  It was written collaboratively by a community of mostly volunteers located around the world.  And in a very different arena,  it was the power of community that recently helped propel our current President to the White House.

Now with tools like Twitter and Facebook new communities are being created by the minute and companies and causes all want to know how to harness and leverage the power of community.  Marketing guru Seth Godin has even jumped on the bandwagon with his book “Tribes” an inspiring but content lite work discussing how ideas, people and leaders can be brought together to accomplish big things.

“I’m in charge here” doesn’t work for a Community

Although it may be obvious to some, the most important thing to know about a community is that its about influence and not control.  You can’t direct a community to do anything.  What you can do is provide great products, ideas etc that your community can get behind, promote and help make better.  Its about acknowledging their help and providing the tools and resources to help them help you.  As Max Spevack, the former Community Manager for Fedora Linux once told me, “It’s about the power of persuasion and ‘thank you.’”  Or as the motto of Obama’s field campaign states: “Respect. Empower. Include.”  [Note: this paragraph is recycled from a previous entry]

Learn How to Community

If you want to learn more from the folks actually doing it you may want to check out The Community Leadership Seminar that is being held on July 18-19  in San Jose, CA.   The event is the brainchild of Ubuntu Community manager Jono Bacon and is supported by O’Reilly events.  As the website says

The event pulls together the leading minds in community management, relations and online collaboration to discuss, debate and continue to refine the art of building an effective and capable community.

In true community fashion the majority of sessions will be an unconference format where the topics for discussion will be decided on the day and will be characterized by discussions as opposed to lectures.

And the cost — FREE.  So if you’re heading out to OSCON, which runs from July 20 to 24th, you may want to come out a couple days early.  Or you may just want to attend the event.  Its got an amazing list of attendees already signed up.

Pau for now…


It takes a Community (and they could use a Marketing Guide) — Mozilla Debut’s theirs

February 26, 2009

It’s 2009 and most of us appreciate the power of the community.  It has been what has driven the ascendancy of free and open source software.  It is what helped propel our current President to the White House.

obamacommunity

Obama community in action. Source: Huffington Post

“I’m in charge here” doesn’t work for a community

Although it may be obvious to some, the most important thing to know about a community is that its about influence and not control.  You can’t direct a community to do anything.  What you can do is provide great products, ideas etc that your community can get behind, promote and help make better.  Its about acknowledging their help and providing the tools and resources to help them help you.  As Max Spevack, the former Community Manager for Fedora Linux once told me, “It’s about the power of persuasion and ‘thank you.’”  Or as the motto of Obama’s field campaign states: “Respect. Empower. Include.”

debianhackers

Hackers working on Debian GNU/Linux, an entirely community built distro. (Source: My pic from Debconf8 in Argentina).

Does it work elsewhere?

So the power of community is now recognized in the development of open source software as well as in the marketing of a presidential candidate.  What about in the marketing of open source software?

Various software communities do look to members to help with many aspects of marketing, just ask Jono Bacon community leader for Ubuntu Linux or Zonker Brockmeier of OpenSUSE.  What I haven’t seen however is an actual marketing guide developed with and for the community.  That is until yesterday (there must be another community that has such a guide, I just cant think of any).

A Guide is Born

Back in November, my former Sun compadre, Patrick Finch now of Mozilla posted a blog entry imaginatively entitled, Wanted: A Guide To Community Marketing At Mozilla that discussed “the need to help the community do as much of its own marketing as possible.”  Yesterday Patrick blogged the arrival of the Mozilla Community Marketing Guide.

The guide’s brief intro explains “We hope the guide helps Mozillians identify activities they wish to undertake and point them to the resources that are already available to the community.”  Those resources are then categorized into 14 topics  such as, Public Speaking , Blogging, Tagging and Social Networking, Promoting the Mozilla Mission and  Guerrilla Marketing Activities. It also has a section that talks about what is community marketing and show cases some of Mozilla’s most famous grass roots campaigns like the Firefox crop circle and the New York Times ad.

firefox_crop_circle

Strange things happen up in Oregon.  (Read how OSU students did this.)

Gettin’ better all the time

The guide like many resources for the community, and following the Web 2.0 tenant of the “eternal beta,” is positioned as work in a progress that will be added to and updated.

I think this is guide is a great idea to help the community help Mozilla.  One of the the greatest value I see in this is, by show casing the efforts of community members it helps to give others ideas and motivate them.  I will be very interested to see how this grows and is used going forward.

Although the power of the community is now recognized it is fascinating to see the tools and tactics that are being developed to further support its members and harness their energy.   This is a space is one to keep an eye on and watch develop as it becomes more and more mainstream.

Pau for now…


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