Working on Triton in the lab, what’s on the horizon

January 27, 2016

As we’ve talked about before, a few of us in Dell’s CTO group have recently been working with our friends at Joyent.   This effort is a part of the consideration of platforms capable of intelligently deploying workloads to all major infrastructure flavors – bare-metal, virtual machine, and container.

Today’s post on this topic comes to us complements of Glen Campbell — no, not that one, this one:

Glen has recently come from the field to join our merry band in the Office of the CTO.  He will be a part of the Open Source Cloud team looking at viable upstream OSS technologies across infrastructure, OS, applications, and operations.

Here is what Glen had to say:

What’s a Triton?

Joyent’s Triton Elastic Container Infrastructure, a Private Cloud variant of the Joyent Elastic Container Service PublicTriton slide

Cloud, allows customers to take advantage of the technologies and scale Joyent leverages in their Public Cloud.

On the Triton Elastic Container Infrastructure (which I’ll call “Triton” from now on) bare-metal workloads are intelligently sequestered via the use of the “Zones” capabilities of SmartOS.   Virtual machines are deployed via the leveraged KVM hypervisor in SmartOS, and Docker containers are deployed via the Docker Remote API Implementation for Triton and the use of the Docker or Docker Compose CLIs.

What’s the Dell/Joyent team doing?

As part of interacting with Triton we are working to deploy a Dell application, our Active System Manager (ASM), as a series of connected containers.

The work with Triton will encompass both Administrative and Operative efforts:

Administrative

  • Investigate user password-based authentication via LDAP/Active Directory
    • in conjunction with SSH key-based authentication for CLI work

Operative

  • Use of:
    • Admin web UI and User Portal to deploy single/multi-tier applications
    • Joyent Smart Data Center (SDC) node.js client to deploy from remote CLI
      • Newer Triton node client to see next-gen of “sdc-X” tools
  • Docker Compose
    • build a multi-tier Docker application via Docker Compose, deploy on Triton via its Docker Remote API endpoint
  • Triton Trident…
    • deploy a 3-tier application composed of:
      • Zone-controlled bare-metal tier (db – MySQL)
      • Docker-controlled container tier (app – Tomcat)
      • VM-based tier (presentation – nginx)
    • Dell Active System Manager — a work in progress
      • aligning with Dell’s internal development and product group to establish a container architecture for the application

Stay tuned

Our test environment has been created and the Triton platform has been deployed.  Follow-on blog posts will cover basic architecture of the environment and the work to accomplish the Admin and Ops tasks above.  Stay tuned!

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…


Mark Shuttleworth talks 16.04 LTS, Snaps & Charms

January 26, 2016

Last week I flew out to sunny California to participate in SCaLE 14x and the UbuCon summit.  As the name implies this was the 14th annual SCaLE (Southern California Linux Expo) and, as always, it didn’t disappoint.  Within SCaLE was the UbuCon summit which focused on what’s going on within the Ubuntu community and how to better the community.

While there I got to deliver a talk on Project Spuntik The Sputnik story: innovation at a large company, I also got to hang out with some of the key folks within the Ubuntu and Linux communities.  One such person is Mark Shuttleworth, Ubuntu and Canonical founder.  I grabbed some time with Mark between sessions and got to learn about the upcoming 16.04 LTS release (aka Xenial Xerus) due out on April 21st.

Take a gander:

Some of the ground Mark covers

The big stories for 16.04 LTS

  • LXD — ultralight VMs that operate like containers and give you the ability to run 100s of VMs on a laptop.   Mark’s belief is that this will fundamentally change the way people use their laptops to do distributed development for the cloud.
  • Snappy — a very tight packaging format, for Ubuntu desktop and server distros.  It provides a much better way of sharing packages than PPAs and Snaps provide a cleaner, faster way of creating packages.

Juju and charms

  • Where do Juju charms and snappy intersect? (hint: They’re orthogonal but work well together, charms can use snaps)

OS and services

  • The idea is to have the operating system fade into the background so that users can focus instead on services in the cloud eg “give me this service in the cloud” (which juju will allow) or “deliver this set of bits to a whole set of machines ala snappy”

Pau for now…


Covering Mesos and Mesosphere

January 8, 2016

Today’s post is the penultimate video in my series of interviews from KubeCon back in November.  Below, Aaron Bell, the product manager working on developer facing tools, talks about the Mesos project and Mesosphere — what they do and who’s using it.

Some of the ground Aaron covers

  • How mesosphere is connected to the Apache Mesos project (powers Siri and is used at Twitter) 50% of the committers
  • What Mesos does and how it works
  • DCOS (data center OS) what it is
  • What to expect from Mesos in the next year

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…


Talking to ClusterHQ founder about Flocker and the Dell storage plugin

January 7, 2016

Continuing with my videos from KubeCon, here is a chat ClusterHQ’s founder and CTO, Luke Marsden.  Luke explains Flocker, how its being used and talks about the Dell/Flocker driver.

Some of the ground Luke covers

  • What is Flocker (hint: a way to connect the container universe to the storage universe)
  • Why you don’t want containers that are “pets rather than cattle”
  • What types of customers are using Flocker and how Swisscom uses it along with Cloud Foundry
  • The Dell storage center plugin for Flocker

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…


Learning about CoreOS and Tectonic

January 6, 2016

With today’s post we are five interviews into the videos I took at Kubecon with three remaining.

Today’s interviewee is Rob Szumski, one of the early employees of CoreOS.  Rob explains CoreOS, Tectonic and where CoreOS is going from here.

Some of the ground Rob covers

  • CoreOS began as an operating system for large scale clusters and how Docker came around at just the right time and worked with CoreOS
  • CoreOS as the original micro OS
  • The components of Tectonic – How you should deploy your containers, on top of: kubernetes, flannel, coreOS, etc; it also comes with support and architectural help
  • Whats on tap for CoreOS and Tectonic – tools and more

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…


Learning about Joyent and Triton, the elastic container infrastructure

January 5, 2016

Here’s another interview from KubeCon back in November.  This one’s a twofer.  Joyent’s CEO and CTO, Scott Hammond and Bryan Cantrill respectively, talk about taking their learnings from Solaris zones and applying them to the world of modern apps and containers.

Some of the ground Scott and Bryan cover

  • Joyent, a software company focused on delivering a container native software infrastructure platform
  • They had been doing containers for 6 years and when Docker came along they focused on that
  • How Solaris zones came about, how Joyent picked it up and ran with it, and how it acted as a foundation for today’s containerized world – How they were in the right place at the wrong time
  • Whats in store for Joyent going forward – supporting the movement to modern app dev and the intersection of containers – taking this new tech and productizing and simplifying them to allow enterprises to roll them out

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…

 


Red Hat launches OpenShift v3.1, full of Docker/Kubernetes goodness

January 4, 2016

Im just getting around to publishing my interviews from KubeCon back in November

Today’s interview features Red Hat’s Grant Shipley, director of developer advocacy for “container application platform” OpenShift.  Grant talks about the launching of OpenShift v3.1 and what’s ahead.

Some of the ground Grant covers:

  • Announcing 3.1, the latest upstream version of Red Hat’s open source project OpenShift Origin
  • Enterprise comes with support for docker/kubernetes in production
  • Moving away from “PaaS” to “container application platform”
  • All functionality exposed via apis; cli and web console tools for ops; ops has full control but devs can self service
  • How it works with Ansible (or Puppet and Chef)
  • Whats next going forward: continuing to focus on dev experience whether they’re using node.js or Java

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now


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