Microsoft and Containers

August 24, 2016

Earlier this summer I was out in Seattle for DockerCon.  Among the people I interviewed was Taylor Brown of Microsoft.  While Microsoft may not be the first company you think of when talking containers, they actually have a bunch going on.  Taylor in fact leads the team focusing on the server container technology coming out of Windows e.g. Hyper-V containers and Windows server containers.

Taylor and I sat down and he took me through what his team has been up to and their goals for the future.

Take a listen

Some of the ground Taylor covers

  • Taylor and his team support customers running Windows on Azure, Amazon, Google and others.
  • The team has been working closely with Docker and the community contributing code to allow Docker to work with Windows
  • Windows Server 2016 will come with full container support
  • Following on Azure’s container services with Linux, they’re adding Windows support
  • Goals for the future: performance and scaling are a big focus; security around authentication and authorization;  also thinking about Linux containers on Windows

Extra-credit reading

  • Docker’s Close Integration with Windows Server – Redmond magazine
  • Microsoft PowerShell Goes Open Source, Arrives On Linux, Mac – InformationWeek
  • VIDEO: Ubuntu comes to the Windows desktop — OpenStack summit – Barton’s Blog

Pau for now…


EMC Dojo – Teaching the way of Modern Software Development

August 24, 2016

Last but not least in my series of interviews from SpringOne Platform stars Brain Roche of EMC.  Brian heads up engineering for EMC Dojo, headquartered in Cambridge Massachusetts.  The dojo, which has been around for a year, teaches modern software development practices based on DevOps and focuses on Cloud Foundry.

Take a listen as Brian talks about the dojo, how it works and where it’s going.

Some of the ground Brian covers

  • Teaching pair programming, extreme programming and more with the goal of showing customers and partners how to rapidly deliver software in the modern world to better serve customers.
  • Qualifying as a Cloud Foundry dojo by contributing to a Cloud Foundry sanctioned open source project.
  • The dojo’s qualifying project is RackHD which acts as a cloud provider interface, providing and management and orchestration layer to run Cloud Foundry on bare metal.
  • The goals for the dojo going forward including expansion and evangelism.

Extra-credit reading

  • EMC Dojo on Github 
  • EMC Dojo Blog
  • EMC Is Pumping $10M Into Open Source, Launching Dev Program in Cambridge – BostonInno
  • RackHD — Storage kingpin EMC is open-sourcing software to manage and orchestrate server deployment – Fortune
  • An Interview with Cloud Foundry Foundation’s CEO, Sam Ramji – Barton’s Blog

Pau for now…


An Interview with Cloud Foundry Foundation’s CEO, Sam Ramji

August 23, 2016

A couple of months ago at the Cloud Foundry summit I tried to grab Sam Ramji, CEO of the Cloud Foundry Foundation, to do a short interview.  Unfortunately the stars didn’t align and it didn’t happen.  At SpringOne Platform however I had better luck.

Sam, who lead off the keynotes on day two, sat and talked to me about Cloud Foundry’s origins, what’s going on today and what its goals are for the future.

Take a listen

Some of the ground Sam covers:

  • Cloud Foundry began at VMware in 2009 and was open sourced back in 2011.  The foundation itself was set up a year and half ago.
  • CloudFoundry.org wa established to increase the velocity of contributions (over the last year, over 2000 individuals outside of  the core companies have contributed.)
  • While they want to grow the foundation, they need to be thoughtful on how they grow.
  • What drew Sam to the CEO opportunity and the role that APIs and Warner music played in his decision.
  • The foundation’s goals: 1) increase diversity of contributions, 2) increase the foundation’s population, predominantly via end users, 3) determine how best to build a framework that will allow to the effort to survive and thrive over the next 20 years.

Extra-credit reading

  • Talking Cloud Foundry Foundation – OpenStack summit Austin – Youtube
  • SpringOne: The Spring Platform, Where its Been and Where its Going – Barton’s Blog
  • SpringOne: Native Hybrid Cloud — The Pivotal Cloud Foundry Developer Platform in a Box – Barton’s Blog
  • SpringOne: When Web Companies grow up they turn into Java Shops –Barton’s Blog

Pau for now..


The Spring Platform, Where its Been and Where its Going

August 22, 2016

Early this month, armed with my trusty Flipcam (and oldie but a goody), I attended SpringOne Platform hosted by by Pivotal.io.  While there I was able to grab a few interviews with some of the movers and shakers.  Given that the title of the event was “SpringOne,” I would have been remiss had I not grabbed one of the Spring community leaders.  I was able to convince Spring Framework developer, Rossen Stoyanchev of Pivotal to chat with me.

Take a listen as Rossen talks about the history and evolution of the Spring Framework.

Some of the ground Rossen covers

  • Spring Framework’s birth 12 years ago and the role of Rod Johnson’s book
  • Providing tools that simplify and symbiotically work with Java Enterprise
  • Additional Spring Projects e.g. Web Frameworks, Spring Integration, Spring Batch
  • The debut of Spring Boot in 2012 and the quick follow up by Spring Cloud which extended programming to new models
  • Where Spring is headed: reactive programming and much more

Extra-credit reading

  • Expert One-on-One J2EE Design and Development – Rod Johnson
  • Spring Boot, a quick overview — Barton’s Blog
  • SpringOne: Native Hybrid Cloud — The Pivotal Cloud Foundry Developer Platform in a Box – Barton’s Blog
  • SpringOne: When Web Companies grow up they turn into Java Shops – Barton’s Blog

Pau for now…


Native Hybrid Cloud — The Pivotal Cloud Foundry Developer Platform in a Box

August 17, 2016

A few weeks ago at Pivotal’s SpringOne Platform event I met Drew Dimmick of EMC.  Drew heads up product management for EMC’s Native Hybrid Cloud offering.  Native Hybrid Cloud, or “NHC” is a complete shrink-wrapped Pivotal Cloud Foundry developer platform that can be set up in as little as two days.

I grabbed some time with Drew and had him take me through the offering at a high level.

Here is what Drew had to say:

Some of the ground Drew covers

  • How NHC cut set-up time from weeks to days and provides a single-vendor solution
  • Today’s stack is composed of: VxRack with Neutrino nodes + Pivotal Cloud Foundry with metering, monitoring billing etc, all siting on top of OpenStack
  • There are couple of other NHC flavors wating in the wings:
    • Pivotal Cloud Foundry + VMware’s VxRail solution sitting on top of vSphere (today half of all Pivotal Cloud Foundry implementations sit on top of vSphere)
    • Further out, a version featuring VMware’s Photon platform which customers could choose in place of OpenStack

Extra-credit reading

Pau for now…

 


When Web Companies grow up they turn into Java Shops

August 17, 2016

Earlier this month I attended Pivotal’s SpringOne platform conference in Las Vegas.  In case you’re not familiar with it, Spring is a Java Framework “that helps development teams everywhere build simple, portable, fast and flexible JVM-based systems and applications.”

For some of you out there you may be thinking Java is old school and not relevant in in today’s modern world of digital business.  Au contraire mon frere.  James Governor, the D’artagnan of the analyst world,  countered this belief of irrelevance in his SpringOne talk entitled, “When Web Companies grow up, the become Java Shops.”

Take a listen as James backs up his claim.  (For extra credit see the Redmonk Programming Language Rankings below that places Java in the top right corner second only to JavaScript.  Click on the chart to enlarge the rankings).

Some of the ground James covers

  • Facebook as a big Java shop.  Twitter as a member of the JCP (Java Community Process)
  • Seeing a lot of Java innovation even outside of Android
  • Big Data e.g. Hadoop written in Java/JVM
  • We will see cloud native Java in the next 3-5 years

 

Redmonk Q3-16 language rankings

Redmonk Q3-16 language rankings

 

Pau for now…

 

 

 

 


Of Linux Laptops, Open Source and Hawaiian Food

August 8, 2016

In the last two weeks I’ve had the opportunity to participate in two podcasts.  The first was the wild and wacky Lunduke & Whatnot (with Matt) show where System76 founder CEO, Carl Richell and I talked with our hosts about pre-loaded Linux laptops.  

In the second, which was recorded last week at SpringOne platform, Michael Cote hosts me as we talk about the evolution of Free Software/Open Source as well as the history of Hawaii and it’s foods.

Check them both out below.

Some of the ground Lunduke, Matt, Carl and I  cover:

  • [First I video bomb the intro by mistake]
  • How long System76 and Dell have been selling Linux preloaded on laptops
  • Mandriva as Lunduke’s favorite Linux distro
  • How System76 went from Carl’s basement to an office and a portfolio of 60 offerings
  • Why both companies went with Ubuntu first and why only Ubuntu
  • What are the biggest issues that System76 and Dell face when producing Linux laptops

Podcast #2

Open source and devs at Dell and the changing nature of OSS

The second podcast is audio only and, like the one above, is chock-a-block full of information and zaniness.  Here’s how Cote describes the occurrence:

“I’ve had a theory that the hard-line philosophy of open source has softened in recent times. Rather than thinking closed source is to be avoided at all costs, I think most developer types are a lot more willing to accept closed source bits mixed in with open source bits. That is, open core has “won.” I discuss this topic with my long time pal, Barton George, while at SpringOne Platform, plus the work he’s doing in the developer and OSS worlds at Dell.  We also talk about Hawaiian food.”

Take a listen

Extra-credit reading

  • Cuisine of Hawaii – Wikipedia
  • The XPS 13 Developer Edition THE best Linux laptop. Dell’s fifth-generation open-source developer laptop isn’t just good, it’s great — ZDNet
  • The XPS developer edition: Dell continues to build a reliable Linux lineage – Arstechnica 
  • Dell XPS 13 Skylake (2016) review: A lot for a Linux user to like – CIO
  • Review: The Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition laptop is nearly perfect – Network World

Pau for now…


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